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Further Learning Modules

Here you’ll find links to external websites we think you might find useful.  The Ear Foundation cannot be held responsible for the information found on external websites.

Open Learn is an amazing resource from the Open University offering free online courses:

Hearing

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • distinguish between the major anatomical components of the outer, middle and inner ear;
  • describe the function of the outer, middle and inner ear;
  • describe the structure of the cochlea;
  • describe the structural arrangements of the organ of Corti and the function of the basilar membrane;
  • explain the difference between the four coding mechanisms used in order to transmit information form the ear to the brain;
  • describe the ascending auditory pathway and the funciton of the main nuclei involved;
  • describe the basic principles of psychophysics;
  • explain the difference between intensity and loudness and between frequency and pitch;
  • describe the use of intensity and timing cues in sound localisation;
  • decribe the main causes of hearing impairments and the methods used to rehabilitate hearing-impaired individuals.

From sound to meaning: hearing, speech and language

Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • recognise definitions and applications of each of the terms printed in bold in the text;
  • understand and apply basic grammatical terminology;
  • describe briefly the different types of sounds used in speech in both acoustic and articulatory terms;
  • outline the key features of human language as compared to the vocalisations of other species;
  • describe the complex psychological processes involved in decoding even simple sentences of spoken language;
  • describe briefly how auditory information is converted into brain activity by the human ear;
  • describe different types of language impairment caused by brain damage, and relate these to the way language is processed in the intact brain;
  • explain the different sources of evidence used by researchers in trying to understand how language is processed in the brain;
  • describe the probable stages in the decoding of a sentence of spoken language in the cortex of the brain.